Komiza, a 12th-century fishing port built by Benedictine monks around a deep natural bay at the base of Mount Hum on the western shore of Vis.

Komiza, a 12th-century fishing port built by Benedictine monks around a deep natural bay at the base of Mount Hum on the western shore of Vis.

Winding down along Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast through bays and inlets, along rocky shores and around countless islands offers a feast for the eyes and the palate. Croatia has more than 1,000 miles of coastline and 1,200-plus islands, the largest archipelago in the Adriatic. About 50 of the islands have populations that make for some of the most historic, interesting and picturesque ports of call in the world.

The entrance to the gothic Augubio Palace of the ennobled merchant Giovianni Battista De Gubbio from the 15th century. This ornate doorway lies inside the walls of Diocletian’s Palace, a well-preserved Roman structure in Split, dating back to the fourth century. 

The entrance to the gothic Augubio Palace of the ennobled merchant Giovianni Battista De Gubbio from the 15th century. This ornate doorway lies inside the walls of Diocletian’s Palace, a well-preserved Roman structure in Split, dating back to the fourth century. 

Jumping off from Split, the largest city on the Dalmatian Coast, it’s usually a comfortable run out to the islands of Brac, Hvar and Vis, with their typical calm seas and mild temperatures. The beautiful ports have historic stone structures and red tile roofs that create a colorful, welcoming waterfront scene. Med-style docking, stern to the stone cay, is common in many ports for vessels up to 100 feet and longer. Larger islands offer several ports, each with its own vibe.





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